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At approximately 20 centimeters tall, it must have been a striking sight perched atop the radiator cap of a 1920’s classic car. is one of three rooster-themed hood ornaments produced by René Lalique. Following the Tete de Coq and Coq Nain designed in 1928, the Coq Houdan, model 1161, was created a year later in 1929.

Different to the previous models, the Coq Houdan is a sleek standing rooster, with chest thrust forward as if almost strutting, standing tall and proud on its glass base. It is most often seen in clear and frosted glass, although amethyst versions have also appeared at auction. At approximately 20 centimeters tall, it must have been a striking sight perched atop the radiator cap of a 1920’s classic car.

Like all of the Lalique hood mascots, it’s unknown how many were produced, although the Coq Houdan is likely less rare as others, evidenced by the price tag often found. Commanding upwards of $14,000 depending on condition, this proud cockerel is a superb addition to any Lalique collection.

To learn more about Lalique mascots and their history, read our blog post here.

And keep tuning into our blog as we explore the entire Lalique collection over the coming weeks and months.